Welcome to Crossing Creeks RV Resort & Spa in the heart of iconic Blairsville

Book Now    Contact Us     

 

 

Welcome To Extraordinary

Friday, 07 June 2019 20:18

Dinghy Towing Requires A Careful Choice Featured

Written by

Having a vehicle smaller than your motorhome at the ready when you’re set up at a campsite is a major convenience. It’s easier to drive a smaller vehicle to get groceries, visit a friend, see a movie or venture off road.

If you camp in a fifth wheel or trailer, secondary transportation isn’t an issue. You just drive the unhitched tow vehicle.

For RVers driving a motorhome, it’s a different story. Unless the motorhome is a toy hauler, you have to tow a vehicle. Dollies and trailers can be difficult to maneuver, and trailers add weight—and work. That makes flat towing—also called four-down or dinghy towing—the best solution.

Finding a vehicle that won’t be damaged by rolling along on all four wheels takes work. Only some vehicles can be flat towed, but quite a few are affordable, especially when used. Every vehicle will need a tow bar plus wiring and braking add-ons.

Transmissions Challenged

A dinghy vehicle’s transmission and transfer case must continue to be lubricated as it rolls with the engine off. There’s no absolute rule here. Some vehicles can be towed thousands of miles, some a few hundred and only below a certain speed. Some models may be flat towable in automatic and manual transmission models, and some in one but not the other. Generally speaking, an all-wheel-drive or 4-wheel-drive vehicle must have a transfer case that can be shifted to neutral. Take note: With electronically controlled transmissions and transfer cases, traditional rules don’t apply.

Edmunds.com, a reliable site that reviews and lists equipment available on new and used vehicles, says that among the things you must know to flat tow are whether to pull fuses and which ones, what must be switched on or off, how to position the shift lever, and how often you must stop and run the engine for lubrication (sometimes as often as every six hours). In general, ignition switches are placed in the “accessories” position so the steering wheel will turn.

Still, you have to know which vehicles are flat-towing approved.

Dinghy-Towable Vehicle Lists

First, decide the kind of vehicle you want. Do you just want a car that can be towed, then driven into town? Or do you want an all- or 4-wheel-drive SUV or truck that can take you off road?

Then consult a list, such as the list from Motorhome.com, which has dinghy vehicle guides going back to 1990. Downloads are free. Goodsam.com also publishes the list. The 2019 guide lists 65 vehicles, from subcompact cars to 4-wheel-drive pickups. It tells you speed and distance limits, plus what needs to be done before towing.

Talk only to industry people you absolutely trust:

  • Dealerships. Don’t ask just any car salesman. Let’s face it: Some salesmen are knowledgeable and some know less about cars than your dad taught you when you were 10. A few just make stuff up to get sale. Even if he doesn’t offer what you need, one you trust might have suggestions.
  • RV dealership. Ask about dinghy towing but emphasize that you want a car that is manufacturer-approved for four-down towing.
  • Your mechanic. Mechanics see and hear a lot. If they have seen two or three of a model that fail even though the factory approved them for dinghy use, they’ll tell you. And if they don’t know, they’ll probably tell you that, too.

Check the Owner’s Manual First

Before you buy any vehicle for dinghy use, check the owner’s manual for that make, model and year. Edmund’s says an owner’s manual will explain whether a vehicle is approved for dinghy towing and how towing must be done. “Check the manual,” Edmunds emphasizes, “then check again.” Remember: Dinghy approval for a model can change from year to year, so get the right year manual.

Owners manuals, even for past years, usually can be found online by searching “year make model owners manual.”  

Modifying for Dinghy Towing

Can you modify a vehicle for dinghy towing? Technically, yes. An RV dealer can do the work. But it’s risky. Modifications may not protect the vehicle’s transmission, transfer case or electronics as the accessories maker claims. Modifications also will invalidate the vehicle manufacturer’s warranty, so if the vehicle fails, you’re out a ton of money.

Read 297 times Last modified on Friday, 07 June 2019 20:25

Leave a comment

Make sure you enter all the required information, indicated by an asterisk (*). HTML code is not allowed.

Facebook

Twitter